Category Archives: Events

Join Us: Workshop on May 2 with Ellen Gruber Garvey

May 2 Writing with scissorsIt is with great excitement that we invite you to our upcoming workshop with Ellen Gruber Garvey, Professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies at New Jersey City University and the author of a new book, Writing With Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance (Oxford UP, 2012). Please join us on May 2, 6:00-8:00 PM at 19 University Place, Room 222. The event is free and open to the public and refreshments will be served.

Professor Garvey will present from her work in a talk entitled “Writing With Scissors: Scrapbooks as Archive & Activism” and Jenna Freedman, Director of Research & Instruction and Zine Librarian at Barnard Library, will offer a response. As is our custom, a good deal of time will be devoted to workshop-style discussion, so please bring your questions! We promise our speakers will stimulate your curiosity about a wide range of topics, including what scrapbooks (and scrapbook-makers) can reveal to us about U.S. literary, political and cultural histories and of course, about archives & activism.

For more information about Writing With Scissors, check out Christopher Benfey’s “Scrapbook Nation” post at the New York Review of Books blog here. You can also read more about Jenna Freedman’s work at her blog, Lower East Side Librarian.

We look forward to seeing you on May 2! Stay tuned on Twitter @NYUArchiveWork for news, updates and future announcements.

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TOMORROW: “Why Documents Matter,” 6-8 PM

Here’s a reminder about tomorrow’s exciting workshop, “Why Documents Matter,” featuring Kristina Lundblad. Please join us! Information follows below.

The NYU English Department and the Workshop in Archival Practice present
“Why Documents Matter:
The Materiality of Literature”
Kristina Lundblad, Lund University Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences
November 29, 6:00-8:00 PM

19 University Place, Room 222
Free and open to the public; refreshments will be served

Kristina Lundblad, senior lecturer at Lund University’s Division for ALM and Book History, will present her research on the history of publishers’ book-bindings and discuss new ways of thinking about what book history can show us. Lundblad asks us to broaden our understanding of the materiality of literature to include not only the histories of books’ production and circulation but also ideas about what materiality does on a more ecological and psychological level. What are the major differences between digital materiality and analogue materiality when it comes to books and how do these differences impact archival studies?

“Why Documents Matter” – November 29, 6-8 PM

The NYU English Department and the Workshop in Archival Practice present
“Why Documents Matter: The Materiality of Literature”
Kristina Lundblad, Lund University Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences
November 29, 6:00-8:00 PM; 19 University Place, Room 222
Free and open to the public; refreshments will be served

Kristina Lundblad, senior lecturer at Lund University’s Division for ALM and Book History, will present her research on the history of publishers’ book-bindings and discuss new ways of thinking about what book history can show us. Lundblad asks us to broaden our understanding of the materiality of literature to include not only the histories of books’ production and circulation but also ideas about what materiality does on a more ecological and psychological level. What are the major differences between digital materiality and analogue materiality when it comes to books and how do these differences impact archival studies?

The View From Left Field: Nov 1, 6-8 PM

Workshop in Archival Practice: The View From Left Field
November 1, 6:00-8:00 PM
19 University Place, Room 222

Supported by the NYU Graduate Program in English and Co-Sponsored by the Modern and Contemporary Colloquium
Workshop Leaders
Shelley Rice, Arts Professor in Department of Photography and Imaging and
Department of Art History and Exhibition Co-Curator
Jonno Rattman, Exhibition Co-Curator
Hillel Arnold, Project Archivist and Exhibition Consultant

Exhibition Information: The View from Left Field is currently on view (through November 17th) in the Department of Photography & Imaging at New York University: 721 Broadway, 8th Floor. The exhibition is dedicated to Michael Nash.

You can read more about the exhibition in a blog post by Shelley Rice here.

Event Description: What does it take to bring images from the archives into the classroom and onto gallery walls? The View From Left Field, an exhibition co-curated by Professor Shelley Rice, Jonno Rathman and the late Michael Nash, answers this question by demonstrating the evolution of what Professor Rice has called a “world in a box”—an exhibition of photographs that grew from Professor Rice’s Fall 2011 seminar, “Toward a Critical Vocabulary” and has emerged as a showcase of the Daily Worker/Daily World Photographs Collection, part of the archives of the Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) at New York University’s Tamiment Library & Robert Wagner Labor Archives. The View From Left Field marks an unprecedented fusion of pedagogy with institutional collaboration and offers its viewers a window into the histories of photography, journalism, American diplomacy and the lived reality of citizens in the grip of a 20th century indelibly marked by the Cold War. Co-curators Shelley Rice and Jonno Rattman, along with project archivist Hillel Arnold, will speak about their experiences in designing and implementing The View From Left Field and will take your questions about the challenges and rewards of their innovative and in-depth engagement with the Tamiment Library’s archival holdings. Open to students, archivists and faculty from any department or institution.

 

Show and Prove 2012: tomorrow, Saturday March 31

I am thrilled to be moderating a roundtable discussion, “Hip Hop & the Archives,” as a part of Show and Prove 2012, a day-long conference at NYU tomorrow. Please join us for an exciting and productive discussion with an outstanding group of panelists:

Katherine A. Reagan, Curator of Rare Books, Cornell University
Ben Ortiz, Curatorial Assistant, Hip Hop Collection, Cornell University
Martha Diaz, Founding Director and Co-Principal Investigator, Hip Hop Education Center
Dr. Nicole Hodges-Persley, Assistant Professor of Theater Studies, Hip Hop Archive
Dr. Mary Fogarty, Assistant Professor of Dance Studies, York University
Tahir Hemphill, Founder of The Hip Hop Word Count

Time: 1:00 PM; Location: 721 Broadway, 6th Floor, Room 612 (NYU Performance Studies)

You can find more information and a complete schedule for the conference here.

Join Us: Networked New York Conference March 9 at NYU

The Project on New York Writing, the Colloquium in American Literature and Culture, and the Workshop in Archival Practice at New York University present

Networked New York: a conference on material, literary and digital connections in the city

Friday, March 9, 2012, 10:00 am – 5:30 pm

19 University Place, the Great Room

all sessions are free and open to the public

Keynote: “Playing the Field, Thoughts about Social Networks and the New York Downtown Arts Scene”

 Marvin Taylor, Director, Fales Library & Special Collections

Schedule (click for annotated program) 

10:00 – 11:15, Panel 1 – Institution and Enterprise

11:15 – 12:30, Panel 2 – Community, Production, and Place

1:30 – 2:45, Panel 3 – Authors and Neighborhoods

3:00 – 4:00, Keynote – “Playing the Field, Thoughts about Social Networks and the New York Downtown Arts Scene”

4:00 – 5:30, Panel 4 – Blogscapes and Digital Interaction

For more information, visit networkednewyork.wordpress.com, e-mail us at  nyucalc@gmail.com, or find us on Twitter @NYUCALC and @NYUArchiveWork. 

Springing into March Collaborations

For the Workshop in Archival Practice, Spring 2012 is abuzz with exciting collaborations! First up (and coming up soon!) is a day-long conference, Networked New York, presented by the Project on New York Writing, the Colloquium on American Literature and Culture and our group.  Join us on March 9 at 19 University Place in the Great Room. From Walt Whitman to the Bowery Boys and beyond, this event is one you won’t want to miss. Detailed information on this event coming in our next post!

On March 16, Jane Carr will be speaking on a roundtable panel with Professor Elizabeth McHenry from the NYU English Department and archivists from the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the 9th Columbia University Libraries Symposium. The symposium will be held from 8:30 to 4:30 in Uris Hall. The theme of this year’s symposium is New Models of Academic Collaboration and we will be talking about the NYU-Schomburg Initiative, an institutional partnership that trains advanced graduate students to be student processors at the Schomburg (including two of our founders, Jane Carr and Laura Helton). You can register for the symposium here.

Finally, look for another exciting conference to close out the month of March. A two-day event on March 30 and March 31, Show & Prove 2012:  The Tensions, Contradictions, & Possibilities of Hip Hop Studies. This event will be held at 721 Broadway, 6th Floor and the Workshop will be moderating an exciting roundtable discussion featuring representatives from the Cornell University Library Hip Hop Collection, the Hip Hop Education Center and the Hip Hop Word Count, along with performance studies scholars. Conference web site and more information will be posted soon! In the meantime, please contact Dr. Imani Kai Johnson for more information.